FACTORS DETERMINING THE ABILITY OF RURAL-BASED UNIVERSITIES TO NURTURE POSITIVE ENTREPRENEURIAL BEHAVIOUR AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

Reference: Muchaku, S. & Magaiza, G. (2022). Factors determining the ability of rural-based universities to nurture positive entrepreneurial behaviour among university students. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Knowledge, 10(2), 80-94. doi: 10.37335/ijek.v10i2.164

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37335/ijek.v10i2.164

Abstract

There is limited knowledge on how to promote the assimilation of positive entrepreneurial behaviour, which undermines start-up venture creation and job opportunities by and for graduates from rural-based universities. Although there is considerable research on the adoption of entrepreneurial behaviour, little has been done so far to enhance an understanding of how various factors influence the abilities of rural-based universities to nurture it. To bridge this gap, this paper uses a bibliometric assessment of the major factors that undermine the assimilation of entrepreneurial behaviour by students in most rural-based universities. Specifically, this study aimed to distill in the literature the constraints that hinder the abilities of rural-based universities to promote entrepreneurship in Africa, America, Asia, and Europe. Purposive and snowball sampling was used to select articles drawn from these geographical areas. Data were analysed using ATLAS.ti software. It was found that various factors largely influence and determine the assimilation of entrepreneurial behaviour. Among these is a) nature of training that institutional curricula provide; b) accessibility of funds and infrastructure; and c) loosely premised cultural orientations. Because of this, there is a need to explore ways to assimilate entrepreneurial behaviour in undergraduate students. We believe the criteria we present for use in assessing the ability of a rural-based university in entrepreneurial education are applicable and valuable in promoting positive entrepreneurial behaviour among students. We hope that this study will be a catalyst for further exploration of interventions that can help in creating an entrepreneurial society.

Author Biographies

Shadreck Muchaku, University of Free State, Centre for Gender and Africa Studies, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Shadreck Muchaku, Ph.D

Affiliation: Community Development, Social Sciences, University of the Free State, Qwaqwa Campus, Private Bag, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa, www.ufs.ac.za.

Email: Muchau.S@ufs.ac.za

Holds a  Bachelor  of  Arts in International Relations,  Master  of  Public Management, PhD in Rural Development from the University of Venda (South Africa). He has been a technical expert for Innovation Champions for Local Economic Development Project (IC4LED). Dr. Muchaku also taught Research Methods, Development Studies, Economics, and International Relations in Undergraduate Schools at the University of Venda in South Africa. Currently, he serves as a Post-doctoral fellow at the University of Free State (South Africa). His main areas of interest are rural development, entrepreneurship, education, conflict resolution and governance.

Grey Magaiza, University of Free State, Centre for Gender and Africa Studies, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Grey Magaiza, Ph.D

Affiliation: Community Development, Social Sciences, University of the Free State, Qwaqwa Campus, Private Bag , Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa, www.ufs.ac.za.

Email: magaizag@ufs.ac.za

Grey Magaiza possesses a PhD in Sociology from the University of the Free State. He has an interdisciplinary research interest in nascent scholarship mainly focused on border studies, social entrepreneurship, green development, community development and social theory. He has publications that traverse border studies, engaged scholarship, and community development. An advocate of interdisciplinary scholarship, Dr. Magaiza continues to build a growing scholarship in inter and transdisciplinary collaborations from his network of scholars that seek to explore intellectual diversity in their approaches. He is currently the Deputy Director of the Centre for Gender and Africa Studies (CGAS) at the University of the Free State, where he is tasked with growing this pioneering interdisciplinary work at the QwaQwa campus and introduce exciting and innovative academic programs with relevance in and for Africa. Furthermore, Grey is the inaugural head of Community Development at the UFS, where he actively oversees the rollout of the NQF Level 8 degree that was the first of its kind in South Africa.

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Published

2022-12-22